Proper Salutes in the British Army

In 1740, the “French salute”, or greeting another by kissing them on the cheek, started to become fashionable in London.  With the Seven Years War (AKA French and Indian War), the “French salute” quickly became controversial, being called unEnglish. Encouraged instead was the “old English” way of “pulling off a Hat. For the British, removing your …

Every Wonder Why We Call it a “Duffle” Bag?

If you make your tent out of ordinary “canvas” you are going to get wet in the rain.  Canvas is a stout cloth, probably named after cannabis (Latin: “hemp”), made by tightly weaving material, mostly cotton, wool, and linen. This definition has not been that precise forever since the word canvas has come to signify …

Building an Inexpensive Fly Tent

Before the latest wave of COVID shut it down, the Regimental Brewmeister was planning to operate a tavern as part of the “Frost Faire” at Pottsgrove Manor. Since running taverns at reenactments is our ultimate goal, I feel the time spent planning that event was well spent even though we were ultimately forced to cancel. …

First Crossing at Washington’s Crossing Sunday, December 13, 2020

CANCELLED Due to COVID 19 Each December, thousands of people gather on the banks of the Delaware River to watch the reenactment of George Washington’s 1776 Christmas night river crossing.  Special Colonial-era activities and demonstrations in the Historic Village offer a full day of family fun and learning.  Admission is charged. Sadly, this event had …

Why was a British Musket called a “Brown Bess”?

At the beginning of the 18th Century when the nickname immerged, soldiers came from the lower orders of society.  “Bess” was the nickname for a common woman, much like the name “Sheila” has been used in Australia.  For example in 1683 Henry Purcell composed a popular song that came to be known as “Bess of …