ENJOY AND EVENING OF REVOLUTIONARY REVELRY AT THE CANNONBALL TAVERN
Experience the ambiance of a colonial-era tavern in Philadelphia when Fort Mifflin transforms the Soldier’s Barracks into the Cannonball Tavern, complete with authentic beverages and hearty tavern fare. Enjoy tavern games, the warm glow of a cozy fire and the company of civilians and soldiers of the era. Outdoor fire pit and cannon demonstrations complete the scene. Period attire welcome but not required. Profits from this brand new event support educational programming.

Remember, Taverns are not just places to eat and drink, there are a vital part of everyday life in Colonial America. See Role of the Tavern in Colonial America.

Of course we do come to taverns to enjoy fine food and drink which is why the Colonial Brewer will be there with the following for you to enjoy:

I am told this has SOLD-OUT at 70 people. If you have not bought your tickets and still want to come, CALL Fort Mifflin as they still want a few more guest in Colonial attire. You can still come join us for a fine night of food, drink, entertainment, and the sharing of ideas.

Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

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