When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few.

April 19, 1775     Shot heard round the world

About 700 British Army regulars were given secret orders to capture and destroy Colonial military supplies stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord.  The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington eight militiamen were killed; the British suffered only one casualty. The militia were outnumbered and fell back, and the regulars proceeded on to Concord, where they broke apart into companies to search for the supplies. At the North Bridge in Concord, approximately 400 militiamen engaged 100 regulars from three companies of the King’s troops at about 11:00 am, resulting in casualties on both sides. The outnumbered regulars fell back from the bridge and rejoined the main body of British forces in Concord.  The British forces began their return march to Boston after completing their search for military supplies, and more militiamen continued to arrive from neighboring towns. Gunfire erupted again between the two sides and continued throughout the day as the regulars marched back towards Boston. The accumulated militias then blockaded the narrow land accesses to Charlestown and Boston, starting the Siege of Boston.


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Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

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