When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few.

June 28, 1776                     Attack on Sullivan’s Island

In early 1776, the British organized an expedition for operations in the southern colonies. Delayed by logistical concerns and bad weather, the expedition reached the coast of North Carolina in May 1776.  Finding conditions unsuitable for their operations, Major General Henry Clinton and Admiral Sir Peter Parker decided instead to act against Charleston.

Arriving in early June, British troops were landed on the Isle of Palms, near Sullivan’s Island where Colonel William Moultrie commanded a partially constructed fort.  The British land assault was frustrated when the channel between the two islands was found to be too deep to wade, and the American defenses prevented an amphibious landing. The naval bombardment had little effect due to the sandy soil and the spongy nature of the fort’s palmetto log construction.  After an entire day’s bombardment. The British withdrew their expedition force to New York, and did not return to South Carolina until 1780.


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Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

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