When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few.

July 30, 1742       Faneuil Hall erected

Built as a gift to the city by Peter Faneuil, Boston’s wealthiest merchant,  Faneuil Hall is a meeting hall and marketplace. Boston was in need of a public meeting house, and the merchant Peter Faneuil offered to build it with his money. The marketplace was designed in the style of an English country market. Rebuilt after a fire in 1761 and greatly expanded upon over the years.  Faneuil Hall hosted America’s first town meeting and played an influential role in the politics of the American Revolution. It is the site of many speeches by Samuel Adams and James Otis, among others, who encouraged independence from Great Britain. It was also the place where Americans first protested the Sugar Act, Stamp Act, and later the Townshend Acts and Tea Acts, following the idea of “no taxation without representation.”


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Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

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