The Pigpen Cipher is another example of a substitution cipher, but rather than replacing each letter with another letter, the letters are replaced by symbols. The cipher has an interesting history: although its true origins are unknown, it has been used by many groups. Most notoriously, it was the cipher of choice for use by the Freemasons, a secret society in the 18th Century. In fact, they used it so much, that it is often referred to as the Freemasons Cipher.

The encryption process is fairly straightforward, replacing each occurrence of a letter with the designated symbol. The symbols are assigned to the letters using the key shown below, where the letter shown is replaced by the part of the image in which it is located.

The key to the Pigpen Cipher is this easy to remember grid system. Letters are represented by the part of the grid they are in.

EXAMPLE:

“Pack my box with five dozen liquor jugs”

Freemasons sometimes add messages to tombstones as seen below in an example from Trinity Church in New York.


Want to Buy Beer from the Colonial Brewmeister?

Help us build a Tavern and Brewery.

Visit our GoFundMe Site


Want the Regimental Brewmeister at your Site or Event?

Hire me

Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: