When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few.

December 1, 1779            2nd Encampment at Morristown

While much in made of the harsh conditions at Valley Forge, the winter of 1779 was the harshest in the war.  “A long and severe storm dumps feet of snow on the winter camp, and large snowdrifts on the roads prevents supplies of food entering camp. At one time it snowed the greater part of four days successively, and there fell nearly as many feet deep of snow, and here was the keystone of the arch of starvation. We were absolutely, literally starved. I do solemnly declare that I did not put a single morsel of victuals into my mouth for four days and as many nights, except a little black birch bark which I gnawed off a stick of wood, if that can be called victuals. I saw several of the men roast their old shoes and eat them, and I was afterwards informed by one of the officer’s waiters that some of the officers killed and ate a favorite little dog that belonged to them. If this was not “suffering,” I request to be informed what can pass under that name.”   — Private Joseph Plumb Martin


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Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

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