When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few.

December 12, 1776          Congress adjourns to Baltimore

In mid-December 1776 Congress decided to move to Baltimore to escape capture by the advancing British.  The time in Baltimore was a trying one for the Congress. There were complaints that “the town was exceedingly expensive, and exceedingly dirty, that at times members could make their way to the assembly hall only on horseback, through deep mud.”  Throughout the session there was inadequate representation from the various colonies. However, it is worth noting that Samuel Adams had declared in the earlier part of the session, “We have done more important business in three weeks than we had done, and I believe should have done, at Philadelphia, in six months.”  The appointment of a committee of five to prepare a plan for obtaining foreign assistance was included in the business of the Congress.

When conditions made it possible to return to Philadelphia, Congress resolved, on February 27, 1777, “that when Congress adjourns this evening, it be adjourned to meet at Philadelphia, on Wednesday next.”  On March 4, 1777, Congress met again in Philadelphia at the State House.


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Published by Michael Carver

My goal is to bring history alive through interactive portrayal of ordinary American life in the late 18th Century (1750—1799) My persona are: Journeyman Brewer; Cordwainer (leather tradesman but not cobbler), Statesman and Orator; Chandler (candle and soap maker); Gentleman Scientist; and, Soldier in either the British Regular Army, the Centennial Army, or one of the various Militia. Let me help you experience history 1st hand!

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