October 1666, King Charles II Granted an Audience to Two Men Who Would Build a Huge Fur Trading Empire in North America and Eventually Lock England in a World War with France.

When Jacques Cartier sailed up the St. Lawrence River in 1535 in search of the Northwest Passage, he met 50 canoes filled with Micmac Indians, who signaled a desire to trade by waving furs on sticks. This began the very fruitful trade between Canada’s First Peoples and the Europeans, first the French and later the …

Colonial Spymaster (#12) — Disguises

If you are routinely going places where the enemy discusses, either intentionally or unintendedly, matters of military or political significance, you may wish to remain anonymous.  To do this, spies employ disguises.  The most common disguise is to simply change your clothes.  Sometimes soldiers sent on reconnaissance missions would wear civilian clothes such as when …

Historical Tidbits

When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few. October 4, 1777                Battle of Germantown After taking the American capital, British General Sir William Howe positioned two brigades and a contingent of Hessians troops in Germantown.   Much like …

Every Wonder Why We Call it a “Duffle” Bag?

If you make your tent out of ordinary “canvas” you are going to get wet in the rain.  Canvas is a stout cloth, probably named after cannabis (Latin: “hemp”), made by tightly weaving material, mostly cotton, wool, and linen. This definition has not been that precise forever since the word canvas has come to signify …

Precedent for the Stamp Act

We are all familiar with The Stamp Act of 1765 which was a tax on all paper documents levied on American colonists in order to pay off debt from the Seven Years’ War (1756-63).  Coming in the midst of economic hardship in the colonies, the Stamp Act aroused vehement resistance.  Parliament pushed forward with the …

What the Hell is a Haversack?

Hang around any group of reenactors and you will always see them with a haversack.  Even though most of us throw our car keys and wallet in there, it’s not a purse.  It’s an essential piece of military kit that dates back to the Middle Ages.  The haversack gets its name from the Dutch word …

Historical Tidbits

When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few. September 29, 1789 – Congress created the United States Army.  Following the Revolution, the Continental Army was disbanded.  This act of Congress under the US Constitution created a permanent …

Samuel Adams was born on September 27, 1722

On September 27, 1722, Samuel Adams was born to Samuel Adams, Sr. and Mary (Fifield) Adams. Samuel was one of twelve children only three of whom survived past their 3rd birthday. Adams went on to attend Harvard College where he graduated in 1740 and after several failed attempts to make a career as a lawyer, …

Historical Tidbits

When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few. September 27, 1777        British take possession of Philadelphia During the summer of 1777, the British army began an initiative to capture the colonial capitol of Philadelphia. British General Howe …

Historical Tidbits

When reenacting or acting as a historical interpreter, its good to have a few historical dates and stories to share. This series will publish a few. September 25, 1789        Bill of Rights On September 25, 1789, the first Congress of the United States adopted 12 amendments to the U.S. Constitution–the Bill of Rights–and sent them …